Author: Amanda

Nigel Sense Finalist in the 2018 Mosman Art Prize

Congratulations to Nigel Sense for being selected as a finalist in the 2018 Mosman Art Prize for his piece The Last Supper. Sense was also a finalist in 2017.

As stated on the Mosman Art Prize website, “Established in 1947, the Mosman Art Prize is Australia’s oldest and most prestigious local government art award. It was founded by the artist, architect and arts advocate, Alderman Allan Gamble, at a time when only a small handful of art prizes were in existence in Australia and the community had very little support and few opportunities to exhibit their work. As an acquisitive art award for painting, the winning artworks collected since 1947 form a splendid collection of modern and contemporary Australian art, reflecting all the developments in Australian art practice since 1947… The 2018 Mosman Art Prize will be judged by artist and former Mosman Art Prize winner Cressida Campbell.”

Nigel Sense is an Australian artist based in Sydney who draws inspiration from the American abstract expressionists and pop artists of the 1960s to make work that is neo social expressionist.

Sense has exhibited his work in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout Australia and in Sri Lanka. In 2009 Sense was exhibited as part of the inaugural Colombo Art Biennale, and invited again in 2012. His award winning first Sydney solo exhibition titled I Work With Tools was held at Sheffer Gallery in September 2012.

Sense paints energetically in acrylic on canvas with bold, direct marks, describing his process as primal and instinctive. His overlaid imagery mimics his state of mind at the end of the working day. Instead of trying to clear his thoughts from the day’s experiences, he paints them—conversations, emails, phone calls, what his colleagues discuss over morning tea—everything goes down on the canvas.

Nigel Sense is a graduate of the University of Wollongong. His work is frequently selected for major awards, most recently the Black Swan Art Prize (Finalist, 2017), Mosman Art Prize (Finalist, 2017) and the Kilgour Art Prize (Finalist, 2017).

 

Esther Erlich Finalist in the 2018 Jacaranda Acquisitive Drawing Award (JADA)

Congratulations to Esther Erlich for being selected as a finalist in the 2018 Jacaranda Acquisitive Drawing Award (JADA) for her piece Hand in glove.

As stated on the Grafton Regional Gallery website, “The Jacaranda Acquisitive Drawing Award (JADA) has been the means by which the Grafton Regional Gallery has gathered a unique and impressive collection of contemporary Australian drawing. Since the establishment of the drawing acquisition prize in 1988 there has been over one hundred works acquired into the collection from leading, established and emerging artists.”

Esther Erlich is a Melbourne based artist celebrated for over three decades for her distinctive portraits. Expressive and alluring, Erlich’s figures demand attention from their viewers. Her provocatively beautiful faces are vivid apparitions above abstracted bodies that exist in no space or time.

Esther Erlich has had over 51 solo and 72 group exhibitions since 1983. She won the prestigious Doug Moran Portrait Prize (1998), the People’s Choice Award, Archibald Prize (2000) and has been a finalist in the Archibald Prize and the Portia Geach Memorial Award multiple times. She is represented in both public and private collections nationally and abroad, including the CAE Victoria, Performing Arts Museum, National Portrait Gallery, ALP Building A.C.T., and the National Library Canberra.

 

Merryn Trevethan featured by John McDonald in Good Weekend

 

Read the article below or on the Good Weekend.

 

Art: Merryn Trevethan

By John McDonald

Lives: River Valley, Singapore. Age: 42. Represented by: Fox Galleries, Melbourne; Yeo Workshop, Singapore; no Sydney gallery.

Her thing: Prints and paintings of futuristic megacities adrift on fields of lurid colour.

Our take: Since moving to Singapore in 2014, Merryn Trevethan has become fascinated by the image of the 21st-century global megalopolis. In big Asian cities, the skyline is constantly evolving, a skyscraper forest lit up at night like an amusement park. On the outskirts of town, millions of people cluster in high-rise apartment blocks.

In Ruin Nation, at Fox Galleries in Collingwood, Trevethan captures the drama of rapid urbanisation expedited by the digital revolution. Her floating cities are science-fiction dystopias which seem to be born not from simple need but from our growing immersion in virtual reality.

Using a mixture of acrylic painting and digital printing, Trevethan’s works suspend clusters of tall buildings against abstract swathes of colour. The effect can be hallucinogenic, especially in a print such as Ruin Nation (56cm x 100cm; edition of five, with one artist’s proof), where cityscapes mirror each other. The mixture of detailed imagery and planes of colour reflects not only the city but the network of circuits and wires that keep it running. It’s a vision of contemporary life as a labyrinth in which we are so embedded that we’ve stopped looking for an exit, and in which a surfeit of information makes it increasingly difficult to be sure of anything.

Can I afford it? Although Trevethan has been exhibiting regularly for more than a decade, she might still be classed as an emerging artist. Her least expensive works are three mixed-media pictures on wedgeshaped boards: Exploded Cities #2, Decentralised Cities #4 (above) and Thin Cities #2 (all 15.3cm x 15.3cm x 5cm), at $500 each. The largest and most expensive piece in the show is the painting Disconnected Cities #1(112cm x 50cm). At $4200, this is a long way from the artist’s record price of $10,000.

Where can I have a squiz? Fox Galleries, 63 Wellington Streetreet, Collingwood, until September 14; foxgalleries.com.au.

 

 

Robert Andrew selected for The National 2019: New Australian Art

Congratulations to Robert Andrew for being selected for The National 2019: New Australian Art. His work will be shown at the Art Gallery NSW from 29 March – 21 July 2019 as part of the three venue exhibition featuring 65 emerging, mid-career and established Australian contemporary artists living across the country and abroad.

As the press release states:

A major collaborative venture, The National 2019 is the second edition of a six-year initiative presented in 2017, 2019 and 2021, exploring the latest ideas and forms in contemporary Australian art.

The 2019 exhibition is curated by AGNSW Curator of Photographs, Isobel Parker Philip; Carriageworks Senior Curator of Visual Arts, Daniel Mudie Cunningham; and MCA Curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Collections and Exhibitions, Clothilde Bullen with MCA Curator, Anna Davis.

As in its first year, the exhibition showcases new and commissioned work by contemporary Australian artists encompassing a diverse range of media including painting, video, photography, sculpture, installation, drawing and performance.

The National 2019 will continue the project’s curatorial ambitions as a large-scale survey of contemporary Australian art in the form of three distinct exhibitions that explore overlapping themes including hierarchy and power, dystopic futures, and ritual and improvisation.

Isobel Parker Philip said The National 2019 at AGNSW reveals how Australian artists are responding with subtlety and intensity to the times they live in, through artworks that are intricate, complex and often charged with a sense of precariousness.

“States of suspense and anticipation characterise the exhibition at AGNSW, as 24 artists navigate the boundary between chaos and control in work that is by turns political, poetic and personal,” Parker Philip said.

“Working with materials ranging from charred wood to many kilometres of yarn, the artists in the AGNSW exhibition explore and test conditions of gravity and suspension, impermanence and fragility,” Parker Philip added.

 

Robert Andrew uses practice-led research to investigate denied and forgotten personal and family histories, utilising open-sourced, programmable technologies and machinery to erode, expose substrates, build stories and create residue. These works manifest as visually scraped back and built up palimpsests that reference technology, natural materials and the ‘artefact’.

Fusing the old and the new, Andrew uses earth pigments, ochres, rocks and soil to build stories of relationship to land and culture and to mine historical, cultural, political and personal events that have been ignored, buried and distanced by the dominant paradigms of our western culture.

Andrew is an artist of mixed heritage, a decedent of the Yawuru people from the Broome area in the Kimberley, Western Australia, as well as of European and Filipino descent. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art and an Honours Degree in Fine Arts from Griffith University, where he is currently a post graduate candidate for a Doctorate in Visual Arts.

Andrew won the 40th Alice Prize in 2018 for his work White Wash Over The Burn (2017). His work is held in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria and has been exhibited as part of Moving Backwards into the Future (2015) and Colony: Frontier Wars (2017) at the Ian Potter Centre at the NGV, as well as Ars Electronica (2017) in Austria. He was commissioned to make Moving from the Binary for the Experimenta Make Sense International Triennial of Media Art. In 2017 Andrew had solos at the Museum of Brisbane and Metro Arts Brisbane.

 

Esther Erlich Finalist in the Black Swan Prize for Portraiture 2018

Congratulations to Esther Erlich for being selected as a finalist in the Black Swan Prize for Portraiture 2018 for her painting Dignified. The painting was previously selected as a finalist in the Percival Portrait Painting Prize 2018.

As described in Art Guide Australia, “From over 500 entries, 40 finalists from across Australia have been chosen for the ‘2018 Black Swan Prize for Portraiture’, Western Australia’s premier art prize. Now in its twelfth year, the prize pool available to professional, emerging and young artists is over $70,000, making it the third richest prize in Australia after the Archibald and Moran competitions.”

Esther Erlich is a Melbourne based artist celebrated for over three decades for her distinctive portraits. Expressive and alluring, Erlich’s figures demand attention from their viewers. Her provocatively beautiful faces are vivid apparitions above abstracted bodies that exist in no space or time.

Esther Erlich has had over 51 solo and 72 group exhibitions since 1983. She won the prestigious Doug Moran Portrait Prize (1998), the People’s Choice Award, Archibald Prize (2000) and has been a finalist in the Archibald Prize and the Portia Geach Memorial Award multiple times. She is represented in both public and private collections nationally and abroad, including the CAE Victoria, Performing Arts Museum, National Portrait Gallery, ALP Building A.C.T., and the National Library Canberra.